Simply Trees

Wintry Winehouse

Ships 1-2 days

Size
$58.00
 
Bright indirect sunOnce a weekSuper easyNot pet friendly
 
  • Lush White and Green Foliage: The Wintry Winehouse showcases lush leaves adorned with bright white and green hues, adding a burst of elegant color and sophistication to your indoor decor.
  • Easy Maintenance: With its moderate growth rate and straightforward care requirements, this aglaonema thrives effortlessly, making it a perfect choice for those seeking beauty without the hassle.
  • Colorful Presence: The Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse's vibrant and bright white and green foliage creates a captivating presence that instantly enhances your interior ambiance.
  • Pot pictured is not included
 

XS, 1 ft or 4 to 6 inch pot
Small, 2 to 3 ft or 6 inch pot
Medium, 3 to 4 ft or 8 to 10 inch pot
Large, 4 to 6 ft or 8 to 10 inch pot
XL, 6 to 7 ft or 10 to 12 inch pot

Please Note: Sizing can differ between plant varieties. Please chat with us if you need clarification.

More Details

Introducing the Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, a captivating and low-maintenance houseplant that effortlessly elevates your indoor decor. With its lush, bright white and green foliage, this aglaonema is a true botanical masterpiece. The Wintry Winehouse is celebrated for its ease of care, making it an ideal choice for both experienced plant enthusiasts and beginners. It boasts a moderate growth rate and typically reaches a mature height of 2-3 feet, creating a vibrant and colorful presence in your indoor space.

Growth rate: Moderate growth rate; reaching a mature height of 2-3 feet, with a similar width.

Water the Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse when the top inch of soil feels dry. It prefers slightly moist but not soggy soil, so ensure proper drainage to avoid overwatering.

Provide your Wintry Winehouse with bright, indirect light to maintain its vibrant foliage. It can tolerate lower light conditions but thrives with a bit more brightness.

Every product typically ships in 1-2 days. You will receive a shipping confirmation with your tracking number once your item(s) ship.

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!

In cases of extreme cold or hot weather, we may temporarily delay shipping to ensure the well-being of your plants. Our primary focus is on delivering healthy and thriving plants to you. Rest assured, we'll make every effort to notify you of any delays promptly.

See how we pack your plants!

Learn more about our Shipping Policy

At Simply Trees, we're committed to your satisfaction. If your plants arrive considerably damaged or sustained damage beyond the point of recovery, please contact us within five days at sales@simplytrees.store with clear photos for assistance. Our 30-day guarantee covers issues after planting, subject to our terms and conditions. We can't cover plants in the wrong climate or with inadequate care, but we're here to help in other situations. For a detailed understanding of our 30-day guarantee and how we ensure a fair process, click here to learn more.

From Our Farm to Your Door

How We Pack & Ship Plants

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!

Frequently Asked Questions

Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse is a compact and small variety of Aglaonema, making it popular for indoor spaces with limited room. It typically reaches a height of 12 to 18 inches and a width of 12 to 24 inches. Its growth rate is slow to moderate, and regular pruning helps maintain its size and shape. Environmental conditions and care practices can influence its specific size.

Aglaonema, including Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, is not known for its rapid growth. Its growth rate is generally slow to moderate. Here's a breakdown of its growth rate:

Growth Rate: Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse is a relatively slow-growing plant. It typically grows at a rate of a few inches (2-4 inches) per year when it is provided with optimal growing conditions.

Time to Reach Maturity: The time it takes for Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse to reach its mature size can vary. However, it may take several years, typically 3 to 5 years, to reach its full height and width under ideal conditions.

Aglaonemas are valued for their attractive foliage rather than their growth speed. They are known for their durability and adaptability to indoor environments. With proper care and patience, you can enjoy a healthy and thriving Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse that maintains its compact and attractive form over time.

Aglaonema plants, including Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, do not necessarily require large pots, but they do have specific pot size preferences based on their growth habits and root development. Here are some considerations regarding pot size for Aglaonemas:

Proportionate to Plant Size: Choose a pot size that is proportionate to the size of your Aglaonema. The pot should provide enough room for the plant to grow comfortably without being excessively large. Aglaonemas generally have shallow root systems, so a moderately sized pot is often sufficient.

Root Space: Ensure that the pot offers enough room for the roots to spread and grow, but it should not be excessively large. A pot that is 1-2 inches (2.5-5 cm) larger in diameter than the current pot is typically suitable when repotting. Aglaonemas prefer slightly snug conditions.

Drainage: Regardless of pot size, it's crucial to have proper drainage holes at the bottom of the pot. Adequate drainage helps prevent waterlogged soil, which can lead to root rot.

Growth Stage: Consider the growth stage of your Aglaonema. Young or smaller plants can thrive in smaller pots, while larger, more mature specimens may require slightly larger containers to accommodate their size.

Repotting: Aglaonemas benefit from repotting every 1-2 years or when the roots become overcrowded in the current pot. During repotting, you can choose a slightly larger pot if necessary.

Aesthetics: Pot size can also be chosen for aesthetic reasons, such as balancing the plant's size with the pot's size to create a visually appealing arrangement.

In summary, while Aglaonemas do not need excessively large pots, it's essential to select a pot that provides adequate room for root growth and is proportionate to the plant's size. Proper drainage is equally important to prevent overwatering issues. Regularly repotting and assessing your plant's needs will help ensure its health and well-being.

The frequency of watering your Aglaonema, including Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, depends on various factors such as the environmental conditions, the size of the pot, and the type of soil it's planted in. To determine when to water your Aglaonema, consider the following guidelines:

Check the Soil Moisture: Before watering, check the moisture level of the soil. Insert your finger about an inch into the soil. If it feels dry at this depth, it's time to water.

Water Thoroughly: When you water, water the plant thoroughly until you see water draining from the bottom of the pot. This ensures that the entire root ball is adequately moistened.

Drainage: Ensure that the pot has proper drainage holes to allow excess water to escape. Never let the plant sit in standing water, as this can lead to root rot.

Seasonal Adjustments: Adjust your watering frequency based on the season and environmental conditions. Aglaonemas typically require more water during the growing season (spring and summer) and less in the dormant or low-light periods (fall and winter).

Humidity: Aglaonemas appreciate higher humidity levels. In drier indoor environments, you may need to water more frequently or use humidity-enhancing methods like misting or placing a humidifier nearby.

Pot Size: Smaller pots tend to dry out faster than larger ones. Consider the size of the pot and the root system when determining your watering schedule.

Observation: Pay attention to the plant's cues. If you notice the lower leaves drooping or becoming slightly wrinkled, it may be a sign that the plant needs water.

Avoid Overwatering: Overwatering can lead to root rot and other problems. Always err on the side of slightly underwatering rather than overwatering. Let the top inch or so of soil dry out before watering again.

It's important to note that specific watering needs can vary from one environment to another, so it's best to use the above guidelines as a starting point and adjust based on your plant's individual requirements. Regularly checking the soil moisture and responding to your Aglaonema's needs will help you maintain a healthy and thriving plant.

Yes, Aglaonema plants, including Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, can produce flowers under certain conditions. However, it's important to note that Aglaonemas are primarily grown for their attractive foliage, and their flowers are relatively inconspicuous and not a significant ornamental feature. Here's what you should know about Aglaonema flowers:

Infrequent Flowering: Aglaonema flowers are not commonly seen when the plants are grown as indoor houseplants. They are more likely to bloom when grown outdoors in their natural habitat or in tropical regions.

Appearance: Aglaonema flowers are small and typically appear as spikelike structures. They are usually white or greenish-white in color and lack showy petals. The flowers are often hidden among the leaves.

Conditions for Flowering: To encourage flowering in Aglaonema, they require specific conditions, including bright, indirect light, warm temperatures, and higher humidity levels. These conditions are often challenging to replicate indoors.

Focus on Foliage: Most people grow Aglaonemas for their lush, colorful foliage rather than for their flowers. These plants are known for their striking and diverse leaf patterns and colors, making them popular choices for interior decoration.

If your Aglaonema produces flowers, it's a natural occurrence, but it's not the primary reason these plants are cultivated. Enjoy the beauty of the plant's leaves, and if it happens to bloom, consider it an interesting bonus rather than the main attraction.

Overwatering Aglaonema (such as Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse) can lead to various problems, including root rot and yellowing leaves. Here are some signs that can help you determine if you are overwatering your Aglaonema:

Yellowing Leaves: One of the most common signs of overwatering is yellowing leaves. The lower leaves, in particular, may turn yellow and start to droop as a result of excess moisture and reduced oxygen uptake by the roots.

Wilting or Drooping: Paradoxically, overwatering can cause the plant to wilt or droop. This is because waterlogged soil can suffocate the roots, making it difficult for them to absorb water and nutrients, leading to wilting.

Soggy Soil: When you stick your finger into the soil, it feels consistently wet or soggy, even days after watering. Aglaonemas prefer the soil to dry out slightly between waterings.

Fungus Gnats: Overwatered soil is often a breeding ground for fungus gnats, tiny flying insects that thrive in moist conditions. If you notice these pests around your plant, it may be a sign of overwatering.

Mold or Mildew: Excessive moisture can promote the growth of mold or mildew on the surface of the soil or the plant's pot. These fungal growths are indicators of overly wet conditions.

Leaf Drop: In severe cases of overwatering, the plant may shed its leaves as the roots become compromised by rot. This is a sign of significant stress and damage.

To prevent overwatering your Aglaonema, follow these guidelines:
- Water the plant when the top inch or so of the soil feels dry to the touch.
- Ensure proper drainage in the pot to allow excess water to escape.
- Use a well-draining potting mix designed for houseplants.
- Empty the saucer under the pot after watering to prevent the plant from sitting in standing water.

Adjust your watering frequency based on seasonal changes in temperature and humidity.
If you suspect that your Aglaonema has been overwatered and the roots are affected, you may need to take corrective action, such as repotting the plant in fresh, well-draining soil and trimming away any damaged roots.

A drooping Aglaonema (such as Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse) can be a sign of various issues with its care. Here are some common reasons why an Aglaonema may exhibit drooping or wilting:

Watering Issues:

Underwatering: One of the most common reasons for drooping Aglaonema leaves is underwatering. When the soil becomes extremely dry, the plant may wilt as a response to water stress. Make sure to water the plant when the top inch or so of the soil feels dry, but do not let it dry out completely.

Overwatering: On the other hand, overwatering can also lead to drooping leaves. Aglaonemas are susceptible to root rot if their roots are consistently waterlogged. Ensure proper drainage in the pot, and allow excess water to drain away.

Light Stress:
Exposure to Direct Sunlight: Aglaonemas are best suited for indirect, moderate light conditions. Exposure to direct sunlight can cause stress and lead to drooping leaves. Move the plant to a location with filtered or indirect light.

Temperature Fluctuations: Aglaonemas prefer stable temperatures and can react negatively to sudden temperature changes. Avoid placing the plant near drafts or extreme temperature variations.

Low Humidity: Aglaonemas prefer higher humidity levels. In dry indoor environments, particularly during the winter months when indoor heating reduces humidity, the leaves may droop. Increasing humidity through methods like using a room humidifier or placing a tray of water and pebbles nearby can help.

Nutrient Deficiency: Inadequate nutrient levels can affect the plant's overall health and lead to drooping leaves. Ensure you are following a proper fertilization schedule with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer.

Root Issues: Check the plant's roots for signs of rot or other issues. Healthy roots are essential for the plant's ability to take up water and nutrients. If you suspect root problems, repotting may be necessary.

Pests or Disease: Inspect the plant for signs of pests (e.g., spider mites, mealybugs) or diseases (e.g., fungal infections). Treat any infestations or infections promptly.

To address the issue of drooping leaves, assess the care routine and make adjustments as needed. Trim any severely affected leaves to improve the plant's appearance. Providing the right balance of water, light, humidity, and nutrients can help your Aglaonema recover and thrive.

Yellowing leaves on an Aglaonema, like Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse, can indicate various issues with its care. Here are some common reasons why Aglaonema leaves may turn yellow:

Overwatering: Aglaonemas are susceptible to root rot if they are consistently overwatered. Yellowing leaves, especially lower ones, can be a sign of root suffocation due to excess moisture. Ensure the pot has proper drainage and allow the top inch or so of the soil to dry out between waterings.

Underwatering: Conversely, underwatering can also cause leaves to turn yellow. If the soil becomes extremely dry and the plant is deprived of water for too long, the lower leaves may start to yellow and droop.

Poor Drainage: Inadequate drainage in the pot can lead to waterlogged soil, which can cause root rot and yellowing leaves. Repot the plant if necessary to improve drainage.

Low Humidity: Aglaonemas prefer higher humidity levels. In dry indoor environments, particularly during the winter months when indoor heating reduces humidity, the leaves may yellow. Using a room humidifier or placing a tray of water and pebbles near the plant can help increase humidity.

Fertilizer Issues: Excessive or incorrect fertilization can lead to nutrient imbalances, which can manifest as yellowing leaves. Follow the recommended fertilizing schedule and dilution instructions for your Aglaonema.

Old Age: Older leaves naturally yellow and die off as new growth emerges from the center of the plant. This is a normal part of the plant's growth cycle, and occasional yellowing of older leaves is not a cause for concern.

Pests or Disease: Check the plant for signs of pests (e.g., spider mites or mealybugs) or disease (e.g., fungal infections). Treat any infestations or infections promptly.

Light Stress: Excessive exposure to direct sunlight or very low light levels can stress the plant and lead to yellowing leaves. Ensure your Aglaonema receives moderate, indirect light.

To address yellowing leaves on your Aglaonema, assess the plant's care routine and make the necessary adjustments. Trim any severely affected yellow leaves to improve the plant's appearance. Providing the right balance of water, light, humidity, and nutrients can help prevent further yellowing and maintain a healthy Aglaonema.

Brown leaf tips or edges on an Aglaonema (such as Aglaonema Wintry Winehouse) can be caused by various factors. Here are some common reasons why Aglaonema leaves may turn brown:

Improper Watering: Overwatering or underwatering can stress the plant and lead to brown leaf tips. Ensure that you water the plant appropriately, allowing the top inch or so of the soil to dry out before watering again. Make sure the pot has proper drainage.

Low Humidity: Aglaonemas prefer higher humidity levels. In dry indoor environments, especially during the winter months when indoor heating can reduce humidity, the plant's leaves can develop brown tips. Using a room humidifier or placing a tray of water and pebbles near the plant can help increase humidity.

Fertilizer Issues: Excessive fertilizer or using a fertilizer that's too strong can cause leaf burn and browning. Follow the recommended fertilizing schedule and dilution instructions for your specific Aglaonema variety.

Drought Stress: If the plant experiences extended periods of dryness, the leaf tips may turn brown. Be consistent with your watering routine, especially during the growing season.

Water Quality: Poor water quality, such as water with high mineral content or chlorine, can lead to leaf tip burn. Use filtered or distilled water or let tap water sit for a day to allow chlorine to dissipate before using it.

Inadequate Light: Aglaonemas can tolerate lower light conditions, but if they receive too little light, it can affect their overall health and lead to brown tips. Ensure the plant is getting moderate, indirect light for optimal growth.

Pests or Disease: Check the plant for signs of pests like spider mites or mealybugs, as well as any fungal or bacterial issues. Treat any infestations or diseases promptly.

Old Age: Sometimes, as Aglaonema leaves age, they naturally develop brown tips. Pruning these older leaves can help maintain the plant's appearance.

To address brown leaf tips on your Aglaonema, identify the specific cause and make the necessary adjustments to care. Trim any severely affected brown tips with clean and sharp scissors or pruning shears to improve the plant's appearance. With proper care and attention to the plant's needs, you can help prevent further browning of the leaves.

The genus name "Aglaonema" is typically pronounced as "ag-luh-NEE-muh."

Eco Pot

$40.00
Size
Color
 
$40.00
 
  • Made from Recycled Materials & Natural Minerals
  • Natural-Looking Hand Finish
  • Lightweight & Durable
  • UV Protected & Frost Resistant