Simply Trees

Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage

Ships 1-2 days

Size
$48.00
 
Twice a monthFull sunDeer resistantSpring to summer
 
  • Vibrant Flower Spikes: Produces striking blue to purple flowers, adding a burst of color to the garden.
  • Pollinator-Friendly: Attracts bees, butterflies, and other beneficial pollinators, enhancing garden biodiversity.
  • Drought-Tolerant and Hardy: Adapts well to various climates, showing resilience in dry conditions and different soil types.
 

More Details

Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage, scientifically known as Salvia nemorosa, is a captivating perennial that brings a splash of color to gardens and landscapes. This plant is celebrated for its radiant blue to purple flower spikes that attract a variety of pollinators. With the right care, Meadow Sage thrives in a range of climates and offers prolonged blooms during its growth period, making it an excellent selection for gardeners seeking to infuse their outdoor area with a touch of nature's elegance.

Growth rate: Moderate growth rate; mature height of 18-24 inches and width of 12-18 inches.

Please note: Images on our website depict plants and trees at full maturity to showcase their expected grown characteristics. These images are illustrative examples only and do not represent the size of plants or trees upon delivery.

Pruning: This plant doesn't need much pruning. Just remove old flowers to keep it looking neat and encourage new blooms.

Fertilization: Usually, the Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage doesn't need fertilizer. But if you want, add a general plant food in spring, following the package's advice.

Winter Protection: Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage is tough in cold. In very cold areas, put some mulch around its base to protect the roots.


Choose a sunny to partially shaded spot with well-draining soil. Dig a hole slightly larger than the root ball. Plant the sage, backfill with soil, and water thoroughly. Space plants about 12-18 inches apart to allow for mature growth.

The Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage is a drought-tolerant plant that loves well-draining soil. Give it a good drink, but not too often, letting the soil dry between times. When it comes to sunlight, Meadow Sage does best in full sun but can handle a bit of shade. It needs about 6 hours of direct sunlight every day for the best growth and bright flower colors.

Every product typically ships in 1-2 days. You will receive a shipping confirmation with your tracking number once your item(s) ship.

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!

In cases of extreme cold or hot weather, we may temporarily delay shipping to ensure the well-being of your plants. Our primary focus is on delivering healthy and thriving plants to you. Rest assured, we'll make every effort to notify you of any delays promptly.

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At Simply Trees, we're committed to your satisfaction. If your plants arrive considerably damaged or sustained damage beyond the point of recovery, please contact us within five days at sales@simplytrees.store with clear photos for assistance. Our 30-day guarantee covers issues after planting, subject to our terms and conditions. We can't cover plants in the wrong climate or with inadequate care, but we're here to help in other situations. For a detailed understanding of our 30-day guarantee and how we ensure a fair process, click here to learn more.

USDA GROW ZONE:

Zones 4-9

Apex™ Blue Meadow Sage is well-suited for USDA Zones 4-8, demonstrating versatility in a range of environmental conditions. It prefers well-drained soil and can tolerate drought once established, making it a hardy choice for diverse garden settings. This perennial thrives in full sun but can also perform well in partial shade.

Frequently Asked Questions

Apex Blue Meadow Sage typically reaches a moderate size, making it suitable for various garden settings. Here are the typical size specifications for this perennial plant:

Height: Apex Blue Meadow Sage typically grows to a height of around 12 to 18 inches. It forms clumps of upright stems covered in attractive blue-purple flowers.

Width: The plant typically spreads to a width similar to its height, forming compact clumps. The mature width can be around 12 to 18 inches.

The relatively compact size of Apex Blue Meadow Sage makes it an excellent choice for borders, edging, container gardening, and mixed perennial gardens. Its neat and bushy growth habit allows it to fit well into various garden designs, and its vibrant blue-purple blossoms add a burst of color to the landscape during the blooming season.

Apex Blue Meadow Sage is a relatively fast-growing perennial, especially during its active growing season. The growth rate of Meadow Sage, including Apex Blue, can vary depending on factors like climate, soil quality, and care practices. Here are some general considerations:

First Growing Season: During the first growing season after planting, Apex Blue Meadow Sage will focus on establishing its root system. You can expect modest growth of foliage, but it may not produce its full display of flowers until the following year.

Established Plants: Once fully established, Apex Blue Meadow Sage can grow relatively quickly during the growing season. It typically forms clumps of upright stems that can reach a height of 12 to 18 inches and spread to a similar width.

Bloom Time: Meadow Sage, including Apex Blue, typically begins blooming in late spring to early summer, and the blooming period can extend into mid-summer. During this time, you can expect rapid growth of flower spikes covered in small, vibrant blue-purple blossoms.

Rejuvenation: To maintain healthy and vigorous growth, consider dividing and replanting established clumps every few years. This can help refresh the plant and promote robust growth.

Pruning: Pruning or cutting back the plant in early spring before new growth starts can encourage bushier growth and more compact form, contributing to faster growth and better flowering.

The growth rate of Apex Blue Meadow Sage may vary from year to year, with optimal growth occurring when the plant receives adequate sunlight, well-drained soil, and proper care. With its beautiful flowers and relatively fast growth, Apex Blue Meadow Sage can be a delightful addition to your garden, attracting pollinators and providing vibrant color during the growing season.

Caring for Apex Blue Meadow Sage is relatively straightforward, and it shares care requirements with other varieties of Meadow Sage. Here are the key care guidelines to help your Apex Blue Meadow Sage thrive:

Sunlight: Plant Apex Blue Meadow Sage in a location that receives full sun to partial shade. It prefers at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day for optimal blooming.

Well-Drained Soil: Ensure that the soil is well-drained, as Meadow Sage does not tolerate waterlogged conditions. Amending the soil with organic matter can improve drainage.

Watering: Water your Apex Blue Meadow Sage regularly during its first growing season to help establish a strong root system. Once established, it is relatively drought-tolerant and prefers slightly drier conditions. Water deeply but infrequently to prevent overwatering.

Mulching: Apply a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to help conserve soil moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weeds. Mulch can also help protect the roots during winter.

Deadheading: Deadhead spent flower spikes regularly to encourage continuous blooming and maintain a neat appearance. This practice can extend the blooming period throughout the summer.

Pruning: In early spring, before new growth begins, prune back the dead or browned foliage to the base of the plant. This helps rejuvenate the plant and promotes new growth.

Fertilization: Meadow Sage generally doesn't require heavy fertilization. A light application of a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in early spring is usually sufficient to support healthy growth.

Dividing: Over time, Meadow Sage plants may become overcrowded and less vigorous. Divide established clumps every few years to rejuvenate them. Divide in early spring or fall, and replant the divisions in well-prepared soil.

Winter Care: Meadow Sage typically goes dormant in the winter. In late fall, you can cut back the dead foliage and leave a few inches of stems above the ground for winter protection. In regions with harsh winters, consider mulching or providing additional winter protection.

Pest and Disease Management: Meadow Sage is relatively resistant to pests and diseases. However, you should monitor for common garden pests and address any issues promptly. Good air circulation can help prevent disease problems.

By following these care guidelines, you can enjoy the beautiful blue-purple blooms of Apex Blue Meadow Sage and maintain a healthy and attractive plant in your garden.

The best place to plant Meadow Sage depends on its growing requirements and the overall design of your garden. Here are some considerations for selecting the ideal planting location:

Sunlight: Meadow Sage thrives in full sun to partial shade. For the best blooming and overall health, choose a location that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. In regions with hot summers, providing some afternoon shade can be beneficial.

Well-Drained Soil: Meadow Sage prefers well-drained soil that doesn't become waterlogged. Ensure that the planting site has good drainage to prevent root rot. Sandy or loamy soils are generally suitable.

Spacing: When planting Meadow Sage, space the individual plants 12 to 18 inches (30 to 45 centimeters) apart. Proper spacing allows for good air circulation and helps prevent overcrowding, which can lead to disease and reduced blooming.

Companion Plants: Consider the surrounding plants and the overall garden design. Meadow Sage pairs well with a variety of perennials and ornamental grasses. It often complements other summer-blooming flowers and can be used in mixed borders, cottage gardens, or as part of pollinator-friendly landscapes.

Wildflower Gardens: Meadow Sage is a great addition to wildflower meadows and naturalized areas. Its tall spikes of colorful flowers attract pollinators, making it an excellent choice for creating wildlife-friendly gardens.

Accessibility: Plant Meadow Sage in a location that is easily accessible for deadheading (removing spent flower spikes) and maintenance. Deadheading helps prolong the blooming period and keeps the plant looking tidy.

Winter Interest: Consider the plant's appearance during the winter months. While Meadow Sage goes dormant in the winter, the remaining seedheads can add visual interest to the garden. If desired, leave the seedheads intact until early spring for their ornamental value.

Deer Resistance: Meadow Sage is often considered deer-resistant due to its aromatic foliage. If deer are a concern in your area, planting Meadow Sage can help deter them from browsing your garden.

Remember to prepare the planting site by amending the soil with organic matter and providing proper care during the growing season. With the right location and care, Meadow Sage can thrive and provide beautiful blooms in your garden while attracting pollinators and beneficial insects.

Meadow Sage does not spread aggressively like some other garden plants, but it can gradually form clumps over time. It typically spreads by producing new shoots from the base of the plant rather than by underground runners or invasive root systems. The spread of Meadow Sage is relatively controlled, and it tends to maintain its clumping growth habit.

If you want to prevent or control the spread of Meadow Sage, you can take a few steps:

Spacing: When planting Meadow Sage, provide adequate spacing between individual plants. This helps prevent overcrowding and allows for better air circulation, reducing the need for division.

Division: Over time, Meadow Sage clumps can become overcrowded, leading to reduced flowering and overall vitality. You can divide established plants every few years to rejuvenate them. Dig up the clump in early spring or fall, separate the individual sections, and replant them in well-prepared soil.

Deadheading: Regular deadheading (removing spent flower spikes) can encourage continuous blooming and help maintain the plant's appearance. It can also limit self-seeding, though Meadow Sage is not known for aggressive self-seeding.

Maintenance: Prune or trim back the plant in early spring to remove any dead or overcrowded growth. This promotes a more compact and attractive form.

While Meadow Sage does spread to some extent, it typically remains well-behaved and does not become invasive. Its controlled growth makes it a popular choice for perennial borders, cottage gardens, and other garden settings where you want to enjoy its beautiful blooms without concerns of it taking over the garden.

Yes, Meadow Sage is a perennial plant, which means it comes back year after year with proper care. It goes through a natural dormancy period during the winter months, and as temperatures warm in the spring, it regrows from the base, producing new foliage and flower spikes.

To ensure that your Meadow Sage returns vigorously each year, consider the following care tips:

Winter Pruning: In regions with cold winters, prune back the dead or browned foliage in late fall or early winter after the plant goes dormant. Leave a few inches of stems above the ground for winter protection.

Mulch: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the plant in late fall to help insulate the soil and protect the roots from freezing temperatures.

Proper Spacing: Ensure that you've planted Meadow Sage with adequate spacing to allow for good air circulation. Crowded plants may not perform as well and can be more susceptible to disease.

Sunlight: Provide the plant with full sun to partial shade, with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day for optimal growth and blooming.

Well-Drained Soil: Plant Meadow Sage in well-drained soil to prevent waterlogged roots, which can lead to rot.

Deadheading: After the initial flowering period, deadhead spent flower spikes to encourage continuous blooming and maintain the plant's appearance.

Pruning in Spring: In the spring, as new growth emerges, you can further prune or shape the plant to encourage bushier growth and a more compact form.

With proper care and attention to its growing requirements, Meadow Sage can thrive and return year after year, providing beautiful blooms and a burst of color to your garden or landscape.

In regions with cold winters, it is generally recommended to cut back Meadow Sage in late fall or early winter, after the plant has gone dormant. This practice helps tidy up the garden, reduces the risk of disease, and prepares the plant for new growth in the following spring. Here are some steps to follow when cutting back Meadow Sage in winter:

Wait for Dormancy: Meadow Sage typically goes dormant in late fall or early winter when temperatures drop and daylight hours shorten. Before cutting back, allow the plant to enter dormancy, which is characterized by the browning and drying of the foliage.

Prune Dead Growth: Using clean, sharp pruning shears or scissors, trim back the dead or browned foliage to the base of the plant. Remove any spent flower spikes as well.

Leave Some Stems: While cutting back, leave a few inches of the stems above the ground. These stubs can provide some protection to the crown of the plant during winter and also serve as markers for the plant's location.

Mulch: After pruning, consider applying a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to insulate the soil and protect the roots from extreme cold. Mulch also helps regulate soil temperature and moisture.

Winter Protection: If your region experiences harsh winters with freezing temperatures and heavy snowfall, you can take additional precautions to protect the plant. Cover the pruned Meadow Sage with a layer of straw, pine boughs, or garden fabric to provide extra insulation.

Spring Growth: In the spring, as temperatures warm and the plant begins to emerge from dormancy, you'll see new growth emerging from the base of the plant. At this point, you can remove any remaining dead stems and tidy up the plant further.

Keep in mind that the exact timing of cutting back Meadow Sage in winter may vary depending on your specific climate and growing conditions. The goal is to remove the dead growth while preserving the healthy crown of the plant. Proper winter care will help ensure a vigorous and attractive display of blooms when Meadow Sage regrows in the spring and summer.

The best time to plant Meadow Sage is typically in the spring or fall, depending on your local climate and weather conditions. Here are some guidelines for planting Meadow Sage:

Spring Planting:
Early spring, after the last frost date in your region, is an excellent time to plant Meadow Sage. In most areas, this falls between March and May.
Planting in spring allows the roots to establish themselves before the hot summer months and promotes vigorous growth and blooming during the growing season.

Fall Planting:
In regions with mild winters, you can also plant Meadow Sage in the fall, usually from late September to early November.
Fall planting gives the plant time to establish its root system before the following spring, leading to earlier and more robust blooms the following year.

Soil Preparation:
Regardless of the planting season, prepare the planting site by ensuring the soil is well-drained and amended with organic matter. Meadow Sage prefers soil that is slightly acidic to slightly alkaline.

Spacing:
When planting Meadow Sage, space the plants 12 to 18 inches apart to allow for adequate air circulation and prevent overcrowding.

Sunlight:
Ensure that the planting site receives full sun to partial shade, with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day for optimal growth and blooming.

Watering:
Water newly planted Meadow Sage thoroughly to help establish the root system. After that, water as needed to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged during the first growing season. Once established, Meadow Sage is drought-tolerant and requires less frequent watering.

Mulching:
Apply a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to help retain soil moisture, regulate soil temperature, and reduce weed competition.

Maintenance:
Prune back the stems in early spring before new growth begins to encourage a bushier shape and better flowering.

Consider your local climate and growing conditions when deciding the best time to plant Meadow Sage. Proper planting and care will result in healthy, vibrant, and long-lasting plants that provide beautiful blooms in your garden.

Meadow Sage falling over can be caused by several factors, and addressing these issues can help you maintain an upright and healthy plant:

Lack of Support: Meadow Sage can sometimes become top-heavy, especially when in bloom. Without proper support, the weight of the flowers can cause the stems to lean or flop over. Consider staking or using support rings early in the growing season to help the plant stay upright.

Overcrowding: When Meadow Sage is planted too closely together or is surrounded by other tall plants, it may not receive adequate air circulation and sunlight. This can lead to leggy growth and flopping stems. Ensure proper spacing when planting, and avoid overcrowding.

Fertilization: Excessive nitrogen fertilizer can encourage lush foliage growth at the expense of sturdy stems. If you've been using a high-nitrogen fertilizer, consider reducing the nitrogen content and choosing a balanced or low-nitrogen fertilizer to promote stronger stems.

Watering: Overwatering or consistently moist soil can weaken the root system and make the plant more susceptible to falling over. Ensure that the soil has good drainage and allow the top inch or two of soil to dry out between waterings. Water deeply but infrequently.

Pruning: Pruning Meadow Sage can help prevent flopping by promoting bushier growth and stronger stems. Pinch back the tips of the stems in early to mid-spring before the flowers form. This encourages branching and shorter, sturdier stems.

Support Rings or Stakes: Install support rings or stakes around the plant before it starts to bloom. This will provide the stems with support and prevent them from flopping over. Make sure to position the supports so they don't damage the plant.

Cultural Conditions: Ensure that Meadow Sage is grown in the appropriate cultural conditions, including well-drained soil, proper spacing, and adequate sunlight. Proper care will contribute to healthier, more upright growth.

By addressing these factors and providing the necessary support and care, you can help prevent your Meadow Sage from falling over and enjoy its beautiful upright appearance in your garden.

The watering needs of Meadow Sage depend on various factors, including the local climate, soil type, and the specific growing conditions in your garden. However, here are some general guidelines to help you determine how often to water Meadow Sage:

Establishment Period: During the first growing season after planting Meadow Sage, it's essential to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Water deeply to encourage the development of a robust root system. Water as needed, typically once a week or more frequently if the weather is exceptionally hot and dry.

Established Plants: Once Meadow Sage is well-established (usually after the first year), it becomes more drought-tolerant. You can reduce the frequency of watering. Allow the top inch or two of soil to dry out between waterings. Water deeply when you do water, but avoid constant moisture, as this can lead to root rot.

Rainfall: Consider natural rainfall when determining when to water. If your region receives regular rainfall, you may not need to water as frequently. However, during prolonged dry spells, provide supplemental watering to prevent drought stress.

Soil Type: Well-drained soil is crucial for Meadow Sage. Ensure that the soil provides good drainage to prevent waterlogged roots. Sandy or loamy soils typically drain well, while clay soils may require more attention to avoid excess moisture.

Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as wood chips or compost, around the base of the plants. Mulch helps retain soil moisture, regulate soil temperature, and reduce weed competition. It can also help extend the time between watering.

Morning Watering: Watering in the morning allows the foliage and soil to dry during the day, reducing the risk of fungal diseases. Avoid watering late in the evening, as wet foliage overnight can promote disease.

To determine when to water, check the soil moisture by inserting your finger into the soil about 2 inches deep. If it feels dry at that depth, it's time to water. Adjust your watering schedule based on your specific growing conditions, but aim to strike a balance between providing adequate moisture and avoiding overwatering.

Our Process

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!